Head Above Water was formed to positively affect Mental Health on the Northern Beaches. They are a bunch of mates that have been touched by the negative effects of poor mental health. They were shocked by the rate of suicide on the Northern Beaches. That coupled with the national rate of suicide rising, it has been the inspiration for Head Above Water to take action.

The name is a reflection of the need to implement exercise as a key strategy that contributes to positive mental health and a sense of well being. It also takes into account that having good mental health is a daily proposition that needs attention. 

It’s a personal journey where at times someone may feel on top of things, while at other

times they may feel like their head is only just above water. Positive mental health is a constant work  in progress. While not without its challenges, we believe in its power to help people lead happier,

healthier and fuller lives.

The people behind the charity are all volunteers giving up their time to try and make a difference.  We are hoping to raise money via entry fees and donations to individual swimmers and swim teams.  We’re also seeking lane sponsors and naming sponsors for the event.  With your valuable support we know we can make a huge difference to mental health awareness, not just in the Northern Beaches, but across Australia

 

We are a not for profit which means all of the money raised goes into funding educational programmes primarily on the Northern Beaches, in partnership with Gotcha4Life

If you, or someone you know needs help, contact the Mental Health Access Line on 1800 011 511 which is a 24 hour telephone service operating 7 days a week across NSW.  Alternatively, contact Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636 or Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14.

 

Suicide remains the leading cause of

death for Australians aged 15 - 44

Our Mission

Positively affect mental health through physical exercise on the Northern Beaches.

 

Our Vision

To help reduce the rate of suicide on the Northern Beaches due to poor mental health.

In a 12-month period, 1 in 5 adult males are

expected to suffer some form of depression